People with mirror-touch synaesthesia experience tactile sensations on their own body when viewing similar experiences to other people (e.g. viewing touch or pain to others). We work with people that have mirror-touch and mirror-pain synaesthesia  (where seeing pain evokes painful sensations on the observer’s own body) in order to better understand factors that contribute to their experiences and to tell us more about how we all understand and share the feelings of others.

We are currently running a number of studies related to mirror-touch and mirror-pain synaesthesia in London (UK), Sussex (UK), and Cambridge (UK). If you think you might have either of these experiences and would be interested in finding out more about  taking part in our research then please contact Michael (m.banissy@gold.ac.uk) and / or Natalie (n.bowling@gold.ac.uk).

Some resources on mirror-touch and mirror-pain synaesthesia can be found below (for scientific publications please see our articles page):

We would like to thank all volunteers that have helped to support our work and helped raise awareness of mirror-touch and mirror-pain synaesthesia – we couldn’t do it without you.


Screen+Shot+2017-07-02+at+6.37.30+PM

Michael will be talking about mirror-touch during his Keynote Lecture at the inaugural Synesthesia Symposium hosted by the International Association of Synaesthetes, Artists, and Scientists (IASAS) . Dr Joel Salinas (author of Mirror Touch: Notes from a Doctor Who Can Feel Your Pain) will also be talking. Come join if you can.